We have a fabulous collection of native fish – all local and some of them over 30 years old! We keep a representative sample in the reflecting pond, so look there to see the most fish all at once. The big water could have almost anything, the lakes are all connected and some of the fish cruise the entire system every day, so always be looking.  Of course, if you bring a bucket of pilchards from the dockmaster's office to the fish feeding station, you will definitely see a lot of fish! Happy fish, we feed them every day.
Our Fish

Lookdown Fish



Goliath Grouper


Bonefish

Jack Crevalle



Filefish



Inshore Lizardfish
 

(Eudocimus Albus)

Lookdown Fish
Description: Lookdown fish have laterally flat, reflective bodies with a steep forehead and protruding lower jaw. The silvery coloring comes from guanine pigments. The pigmentation creates the mirror-like body but can be manipulated to highly reflect light or dim the light, depending on what will best camouflage them in the water. On the second dorsal fin, the first rays length extends to reach the deeply forked tail. The common name comes from its peculiar head structure. Juveniles have light, vertical stripes that disappear with age.
Size: This species can reach lengths of about 19 inches (48.3 cm) and weigh up to 4.5 pounds (2 kg).
BehaviorSelene vomer are highly adaptable, living in salt and brackish waters, and travel in large groups called shoals. The body shape allows them to be quick and agile during the pursuit of prey or flight from predators. Migration occurs at particular times of the year for breeding, winter and hibernation.
Diet: Their diet consists mainly of benthic crustacean, worms, small crabs and fish.
Senses: The eyes do not have any type of adipose (transparent) eyelid which is believed to be used for protecting the eye or as a lens that aids in focusing on an object.
Communication: When feeling threatened or under stress, the swim bladder and teeth are used to make loud grunts.
Reproduction: Spawning is believed to occur further offshore during the summer. Females release pelagic eggs into the water column where males then fertilize them. Larvae are also believed to develop in areas further offshore.
Habitat/range: These fish inhabit shallow coastal waters with hard or sandy bottoms in the Tropical Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico and is common along the Texas coast.
Status: Lookdown fish have not been evaluated by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

 

(Eudocimus Albus)

Goliath Grouper
Description: The Atlantic goliath grouper or itajara, also known as the jewfish, is a large saltwater fish of the grouper family found primarily in shallow tropical waters among coral and artificial reefs at depths from 5 to 50 m. 
Size: This species can reach lengths of about 8 feet and weigh up to 800 pounds.
Habitat/range:
On the Western side, its range includes the Florida Keys in the US, the Bahamas, most of the Caribbean and most of the Brazilian coast. On some occasions, it is caught off the coasts of the US states of New England off Maine and Massachusetts. In the eastern Atlantic Ocean, it occurs from the Congo to Senegal.
Status: Endangered Species - species that are in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of their range.

(Eudocimus Albus)

Bonefish
DescriptionBonefish were once believed to be a single species with a global distribution, however 9 different species have since been identified. There are three identified species in the Atlantic and six in the Pacific. Albula vulpes is the largest and most widespread of the Atlantic species
Size: The bonefish weighs up to 14 lb and measures up to 31 inches long.
Habitat/rangeAn amphidromous species, it lives in inshore tropical waters and moves onto shallow mudflats or sand flats to feed with the incoming tide. Adults and juveniles may shoal together, and mature adults may be found singly or in pairs
StatusNear Threatened Species - species that may be considered threatened with extinction in the near future, although it does not currently qualify for the threatened status.


 

(Eudocimus Albus)

Jack Crevalle
Description: The crevalle jack is classified within the genus Caranx, one of a number of groups known as the jacks or trevallies. Caranx itself is part of the larger jack and horse mackerel family Carangidae, which in turn is part of the order Carangiformes
Size: The crevalle jack is one of the largest members of Caranx, growing to a known maximum length of 125 cm and a weight of 32 kg, although it is generally uncommon at lengths greater than 65 cm.
Diet: The crevalle jack is a powerful, predatory fish, with extensive studies showing the species consumes a variety of small fish, with invertebrates such as prawnsshrimpscrabsmolluscs and cephalopods also of minor importance.
Habitat/range: The crevalle jack is distributed across the tropical and temperate waters of the Atlantic Ocean, ranging from Nova Scotia, Canada to Uruguay in the west Atlantic and Portugal to Angola in the east Atlantic, including the Mediterranean SeaCommon both inshore and in open waters.
Status: Least concerned: has been categorized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as evaluated as not being a focus of species conservation. They do not qualify as threatenednear threatened, or (before 2001) conservation dependent.

 

(Eudocimus Albus)

Filefish
DescriptionAppearing very much like their close relatives the triggerfish, filefish are rhomboid-shaped fish that have beautifully elaborate cryptic patterns. Deeply keeled bodies give a false impression of size when these fish are viewed facing the flanks. Filefish have soft, simple fins with comparatively small pectoral fins and truncated, fan-shaped tail fins; a slender, retractable spine crowns the head. 
Size: The largest filefish species is the scrawled filefish (Aluterus scriptus) at up to 110 cm (43 in) in length; most species are below 60 cm (24 in) in length.
Habitat/rangeThey live in the AtlanticPacific and Indian Oceans. Filefish are closely related to the triggerfishpufferfish and trunkfish.

(Eudocimus Albus)

Inshore Lizardfish
DescriptionThe body of this species is elongated, similar to a cigar. Females are generally larger than males when mature. The shape of the mouth of this species is large and pointed. The snout is pointed. The top jaw extends beyond the eye. Many slender teeth are present in the roof of the mouth and jaws. The lateral line is considered to be well marked. The lateral line encompasses around 60 scales along the length. The inshore lizardfish has no dorsal spines, 10-13 dorsal soft rays, no anal spines, 11-13 anal soft rays, and 56-62 vertebrae. The color of the dorsal side of the lizardfish ranges from various shades of brown to olive. The belly side ranges from white to yellow. Juveniles have dark spots, these spots are reduced/absent in adults. The sides of the inshore lizardfish have patches that are diamond-shaped. These patches vary in occurrence and intensity, they usually fade with growth and usually occur at the midlateral line on the fish. The dorsal fin is on the center of the back. An adipose fin is present in this species, usually showing a darker spot. The adipose fin is small in size with the base of the fin being no longer than the diameter of the pupil. The anal fin is usually equal in length or longer than the dorsal fin.
SizeThe inshore lizardfish has a maximum length recorded of about 50 cm but generally we see them at about 40 cm long. The body of this species is elongated, similar to a cigar. The maximum weight has been seen as 900 g.
Habitat/rangeThe habitats for these fish include the bottom in shallow inshore marine waters, usually over sand or mud bottoms, including creeks, rivers, among seagrasses, estuaries, bays, and lagoons. Adults have been found to be also in the open sea above continental shelves.